Your Amazing Faith, Part 4

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There is no more amazing thing in a believer’s life than his faith. A Christian may be highly educated, credentialed, celebrated, talented, and decorated, but his faith is his most amazing possession. The thing about the Christian’s faith is that nobody else in the world has it; only Christians. The world has its pale imitation of the believer’s faith, and while practicing positive thinking and while maintaining a positive mental attitude may lead to a better and more fulfilling life, those kinds of things are NOT Biblical faith. You don’t have faith naturally; it is placed into your heart by the Holy Spirit. We take our faith for granted but we shouldn’t. It’s what separates us from the rest of the world. It makes us special. It makes us supernatural people.

The basis of our faith is the Word of God, according to Romans 10:17 –

Consequently, faith comes from hearing the message, and the message is heard through the word of Christ. (Romans 10:17 | NIV84)

The object of our faith is not our feelings or our emotions. We can’t gin up faith. Our faith is completely objective, and its object is a Person: God –

So keep up your courage, men, for I have faith in God that it will happen just as he told me. (Acts 27:25 | NIV84)

Faith may be a mystery to some, but not to Paul who had discovered the secret of his faith:

I have been crucified with Christ and I no longer live, but Christ lives in me. The life I live in the body, I live by faith in the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me. (Galatians 2:20 | NIV84)

But possessing faith and living by faith isn’t all sunshine and buttercups. Nobody knew that better that the apostle Peter, and he wrote to Christians who also knew all about how difficult living a life of faith can be.

These have come so that your faith–of greater worth than gold, which perishes even though refined by fire–may be proved genuine and may result in praise, glory and honor when Jesus Christ is revealed. (1 Peter 1:7 | NIV84)

Background

Some people might refer to Peter as “just a fisherman.” But nobody who spent three years in the company of Jesus Christ could be called “just a fisherman.” In fact, if you were to sit down and read through both of Peter’s letters in the New Testament, you would be reading about such things as the doctrines of election, foreknowledge, sanctification, obedience, the extent of Christ’s finished work on the Cross, God’s grace, the Trinity, salvation, faith, and hope! Peter was not “just a fisherman,” and while we always think about Paul as being the towering intellectual of the Christian faith, Peter was no intellectual slouch. He juggled mighty theological concepts while dealing with the day-to-day problems encountered by believers scattered all over the known world.

Here was a man who, at one time, was impetuous; the kind of guy that rushes in where angels fear to tread. Peter often spoke before he thought and some of the dopey things he said surely caused our Lord’s head to shake. Speaking of our Lord, Jesus said this to and about Peter:

Blessed are you, Simon son of Jonah, for this was not revealed to you by man, but by my
Father in heaven. And I tell you that you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of Hades will not overcome it. I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven; whatever you bind on earth will be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth will be e loosed in heaven.” (Matthew 16:17 – 19 | NIV84)

Peter was the “rock” upon which the church was to be built. But before you get all excited about that, Peter, whose name means “rock,” would go on to write this in 1 Peter 2:5 –

As you come to him, the living Stone—rejected by men but chosen by God and precious to him— you also, like living stones, are being built into a spiritual house to be a holy priesthood, offering spiritual sacrifices acceptable to God through Jesus Christ. (1 Peter 2:4, 5 | NIV84)

So, in Peter’s inspired opinion, all believers are “rocks.” We are all Peter. Peter knew there was nothing special about him; he knew he was an apostle, but he also knew he was just one of many. The church is built on people like Peter; people like you and me.

Peter wrote his letters after Paul wrote his, probably between 64 and 67 AD, after Nero had come to power and had begun his persecution of Christians. And we know to whom he wrote his letters, particularly the first one:

To God’s elect, strangers in the world, scattered throughout Pontus, Galatia, Cappadocia, Asia and Bithynia… (1 Peter 1:1 | NIV84)

These were believers in peril; their lives were constantly threatened by persecution on account of their relationship with Jesus Christ and His church. And though Peter mentions persecution many times in his letter, the theme of the letter is not persecution but rather hope in times of persecution. Dr McGee refers to Peter as the “apostle of hope,” and hope in the New Testament is always linked to suffering. What that means is startling and counterintuitive. Suffering, what we all try to avoid at all costs, is something that produces hope.

And the readers of this letter needed hope. They were “strangers in the world, scattered…” all over the place. The recipients were a mixture of both Jew and Gentile believers, and both groups were literally “strangers in the world” and “scattered.” For the Jewish Christians, they were forced out of their homes in Jerusalem and forced to lived in strange, pagan cities. For the Gentiles, their citizenship was in heaven but they had lost so much just to follow the way of Jesus . So both of these groups of precious believers were suffering and that suffering (those trials they were dealing with) was producing something in their lives they didn’t have before: HOPE.

Trials in perspective

It’s easy to understand how trials produce suffering, but how does that produce hope? It all boils down to perspective. When a believer is facing a trial that produces suffering, what he pays attention to makes all the difference in the world. Peter gives us something to think about:

In this you greatly rejoice, though now for a little while you may have had to suffer grief in all kinds of trials. (1 Peter 1:6 | NIV84)

There’s your perspective right there. What Peter is referring to when he wrote “In this,” will become self-evident, but for right now, his point is a simple one: in the midst of “suffering grief in all kinds of trials” Christians should rejoice, not worry or be anxiety-ridden. That may sound crazy to you, but you need to pay attention to it. When you are experiencing trials that lead to suffering, you ought to rejoice – not praising the trials, but focusing on God instead of the trial. The key is forcing yourself to see God, not get bogged down in the trial. Remember what kind of trial Peter is talking about here. It’s a trial you experience because of your faith. We’re not talking about the trial of a bad cold or a feverish child, although you should focus on God regardless of what’s going on in your life.

As a side note, modern Christians have a completely warped out perspective on suffering. We foolishly think that whatever is happening at the moment is the most important thing in our lives. So when we are suffering the trial of a bad cold or a feverish child, those things tower over horizon and we behave in an unseemly way for a Christian to behave. When you drag your sick child to the emergency ward at the hospital and are freaking out because you have to wait to see a doctor, that’s unseemly behavior for a Christian to engage in because it says something very disturbing about your faith. It says you don’t have very much. A moment in the waiting room can ruin your testimony for Jesus Christ. And nothing is more important than that. How you behave when the thumb screws of life get tight says everything the quality of your faith.

But Peter is specifically referring to those trials you may face on account of your Christian faith. When that happens, here’s what “in this” refers to:

Praise be to the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ! In his great mercy he has given us new birth into a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead, and into an inheritance that can never perish, spoil or fade–kept in heaven for you, who through faith are shielded by God’s power until the coming of the salvation that is ready to be revealed in the last time. (1 Peter 1:3-5 | NIV84)

You may be facing trials on account of your faith, but if you keep your focus on what God has done for you and given you in Jesus Christ, your trials pale by comparison. The jeers and mocking, the persecution of losing your job or home because of your faith are NOTHING compared to what you GET in Christ! Thinking about what you have waiting for you in heaven may also seem counterintuitive and a denial of reality, but it isn’t.

Here’s the thing. Our faith in this is both objective and subjective. It is objective in the sense that our faith is in “the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ” and in “his great mercy” that led to our “new birth.” It is subjective in the sense that there are definitely “rewards,” what Peter refers to “an inheritance that can never spoil or fade” that we should think about.

In the midst of these kinds of trials, if we can keep them in perspective and keep our focus on God, we’ll be fine. And that brings us to the verse that started this whole thing:

These have come so that your faith–of greater worth than gold, which perishes even though refined by fire–may be proved genuine and may result in praise, glory and honor when Jesus Christ is revealed. (1 Peter 1:7 | NIV84)

If you think that verse is a little hard to swallow in light of what came before it, try what Peter’s associate, James, wrote on for size:

Consider it pure joy, my brothers, whenever you face trials of many kinds, because you know that the testing of your faith develops perseverance. Perseverance must finish its work so that you may be mature and complete, not lacking anything. (James 1:2-4 | NIV84)

Both Peter and James were not deniers of reality. Neither of them denied that the readers of their letters were suffering trials. They’re giving Holy Spirit-inspired advice that needs to be noticed and taken by modern believers.

As a Christian, you will face some forms of persecution on account of your faith. That persecution may take many forms, but it will come. Even in America. You may find that hard to believe, but all you have to do is ask the Christian who spoke out in support of traditional family values who has been denied a promotion because of it. Or the baker who refused to bake a cake for a “gay wedding” who had to pay a heftY fine. Those are forms of persecution. That you will face some form of persecution is guaranteed. How will you react to it? Peter wants you to understand that your most precious possession is not your job. It’s not your home. It’s not your friendship. It’s not your family. Your FAITH is your most precious possession and though you may lose much because of your relationship with Christ, you can never lose your faith. In fact, that faith is strengthened when you suffer persecution.

Augustine observed:

In the fiery furnace, the straw is burned by the gold is purified.

Martin Luther chimed in:

The fire does not lessen the gold but makes it pure and bright, removing any admixture. So God lays the Cross upon all Christians in order to purify and cleanse them well in order that their faith may remain pure even as the Word is pure, and that we may cling to the Word and nothing else.

Both of those guys were right. Why does your faith need to be purified? It’s because when we live and prosper and enjoy the blessings God gives us, we as sinful people tend to start focusing on them and trusting in them instead of God. Our faith becomes corrupted by other things, even very good things like friends and family and pension plans. When that happens, those corruptions in our faith – those impurities – need to be removed. And God will allow those persecutions that lead to suffering to do just that.

Perspective is everything. And it’s the one thing Peter’s friends needed and it’s the one thing we need, too.

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